How To Find High-Quality Research Topic Ideas:

6 Steps To Develop A Rock-Solid Topic For Your Dissertation Or Thesis.

So, you’re finally nearing the end of your postgraduate program and it’s now time to find research topic ideas and select a suitable topic for your dissertation or thesis. Or perhaps you’re just starting out on your PhD proposal and need to find a suitable area of research for your application proposal. Either way, if you’re reading this article, you’re obviously asking yourself how on earth you should go about finding suitable potential topics from a world of options, and then narrow those down to one choice.

In this post, we’ll provide a straightforward 6-step process that you can follow to ensure you arrive at a high quality dissertation or thesis topic. Follow these 6 steps, in this order, and you will formulate a well-suited, well-defined core research question. There’s a helpful clue already, right there: your dissertation ‘topic’ is best understood as a research question or a problem. Your aim is not to create an encyclopaedia entry into your field, but rather to shed light on an acknowledged issue that’s being debated (or needs to be). Think questions, not topics.

Step 1: Get an understanding of the research process (and your institution’s requirements).

It may sound horribly obvious, but it’s an extremely common mistakes – students skip past the fundamentals straight to the ideation phase, and then pay dearly for it.

Start by looking at whatever handouts and instructions you’ve been given regarding what your university/department expects of a dissertation. For example, the course handbook, online information, verbal in-class instructions. I know it’s tempting to just dive into the ideation process, but it’s essential to start with the prescribed material first. There are two important reasons for this:

  1. You need to have a basic understanding of the research process, methodologies, fieldwork options and analysis methods before you start the ideation process, or you will simply not be equipped to think about your own research adequately. If you don’t understand the basics or quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods BEFORE you start ideating, you’re wasting your time.
  2. Your university/department will have specific requirements for your research – for example, requirements in terms of topic originality, word count, data requirements, ethical adherence, methodology, etc. If you are not aware of these from the outset, you will again end up wasting a lot of time on irrelevant ideas/topics.

Therefore, the most important first step is to get your head around both the basics of research (especially methodologies), as well as your institution’s specific requirements for your dissertation or thesis. Don’t give in to the temptation to jump ahead before you do this. If your university has not provided you with any structured information about the research process, you might consider this short Coursera course: Understanding Research Methods. Alternatively, there’s a wealth of free information online – whichever route you go, make sure you understand the basics of qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods research before you go further.

Always start by reading the dissertation or thesis brief

Step 2: Review previous dissertations from your university (and ideally, your course).

Unless you’re undertaking a completely new course, there will be many, many students who have gone through the research process before and have produced successful dissertations, which you can use to orient yourself. This is hugely beneficial – imagine being able to see previous students’ assignments and essays when you were doing your coursework!

Take a look at some well-graded (65% and above) past dissertations from your course (ideally more recent ones, as university requirements may change over time). These are usually available in the university’s online library – ask your university if you’re unable to find them. Past dissertations will act as a helpful model for all kinds of things, from how long a bibliography needs to be, to what a good literature review looks like, through to what kinds of methods you can use – and how to leverage them to support your argument (PS – your argument will be your response to your own title question).

As you peruse past dissertations, ask yourself the following questions:

  • What kinds of topics did these dissertations cover and how did they turn the topic into questions?
  • How broad or narrow were the topics?
  • How original were the topics? Were they truly groundbreaking or just a localised twist on well-established theory?
  • How well justified were the topics? Did they seem important or just nice to know?
  • How much literature did they draw on as a theoretical base? Was the literature more academic or applied in nature?
  • What kinds of research methods did they use and what data did they draw on?
  • How did they analyse that data and bring it into the discussion of the academic literature?
  • Which of the dissertations are most readable to you – why? How were they presented?
  • Can you see why these dissertations were successful? Can you relate what they’ve done back to the university’s instructions/brief?
Read past dissertations to get ideas

Seeing a variety of dissertations (at least 5, ideally in your area of interest) will also help you understand whether your university has very rigid expectations in terms of structure and format, or whether they expect and allow variety in the number of chapters, chapter headings, order of content, style of presentation and so on. Some departments accept graphic novels; some are willing to grade free-flow continental-philosophy style arguments; some want a highly rigid, standardised structure.  Many offer a dissertation template, with information on how marks are split between sections. Check right away whether you have been given one of those templates – and if you do, then use it and don’t try to deviate or reinvent the wheel.

Step 3: Start the ideation process by reviewing the academic literature.

Now that you (1) understand the research process, (2) understand your university’s specific requirements for your dissertation or thesis, and (3) have a feel for what a good dissertation looks like, you can start the ideation process. This is done by reviewing the current literature and looking for opportunities to add something original to the academic conversation.

Kick start the ideation process

So, where should you start your literature hunt? The best starting point is to get back to your modules. Look at your coursework and the assignments you did. Using your coursework is the best theoretical base, as you are assured that (1) the literature is of a high enough calibre for your university and (2) the topics are relevant to your specific course.

Start by identifying the modules that interested you the most and that you understood well (i.e. earned good marks for). What were your strongest assignments, essays or reports? Which areas within these were particularly interesting for you? For example, within a marketing module, you may have found consumer decision making or organisation trust to be interesting. Create a shortlist of those areas that you were both interested in and academically strong at. It’s no use picking an area that does not genuinely interest you – you’ll run out of motivation if you’re not excited by a topic.

Understand the current state of knowledge

Once you’ve done that, you need to get an understanding of the current state of the literature for your chosen interest areas. What you’re aiming to understand is this: what is the academic conversation here and what critical questions are yet unanswered? These unanswered questions are prime opportunities for a unique, meaningful dissertation topic. A quick review of the literature on your favourite topics will help you understand this.

Grab your reading list from the relevant section of the modules, or simply enter the topics into Google Scholar. Skim-read 3 -5 journal articles from the past 5 years which have at least 5 citations each (Google Scholar or a citations index will show you how many citations any given article has – i.e. how many other people have referred to it in their own bibliography). Also, check to see if your discipline has an ‘annual review’ type of journal, which gathers together surveys of the state of knowledge on a chosen topic. This can be a great tool for fast-tracking your understanding of the current state of the knowledge in any given area.

Start from your course’s reading list and work outwards. At the end of every journal article, you’ll find a reference list. Scan this reference list for more relevant articles and read those. Then repeat the process (known as snowballing) until you’ve built up a base of 20-30 quality articles per area of interest.

Reference list

Absorb, don’t hunt.

At this stage, your objective is to read and understand the current state of the theory for your area(s) of interest – you don’t need to be in topic-hunting mode yet. Don’t jump the gun and try to identify research topics before you are well familiarised with the literature.

don't hunt for a topic yet

As you read, try to understand what kinds of questions people are asking and how they are trying to answer them. What matters do the researchers agree on, and more importantly, what are they in disagreement about? Disagreements are prime research territory. Can you identify different ‘schools of thought’ or different ‘approaches’? Do you know what your own approach or slant is? What kinds of articles appeal to you and which ones bore you or leave you feeling like you’ve not really grasped them? Which ones interest you and point towards directions you’d like to research and know more about?

Once you understand the fundamental fact that academic knowledge is a conversation, things get easier.

Think of it like a party. There are groups of people in the room, enjoying conversations about various things. Which group do you want to join?  You don’t want to be that person in the corner, talking to themself. And you don’t want to be the hanger-on, laughing at the big-shot’s jokes and repeating everything they say. Do you want to join a large group and try to make a small contribution to what’s going on, or are you drawn to a smaller group that’s having a more niche conversation, but where you feel you might more easily find something original to contribute? How many conversations can you identify? Which ones feel closer to you and more attractive? Which ones repel you or leave you cold? Are there some that, frankly, you just don’t understand?

Now, choose a couple of groups who are discussing something you feel interested in and where you feel like you might want to contribute. You want to make your entry into this group by asking a question – a question that will make the other people in the group turn around and look at you, listen to you, think, “That’s interesting”. Your dissertation will be the process of setting that question and then trying to find at least a partial answer to that question – but don’t worry about that now.  Right now, you need to work out what conversations are going on, whether any of them are related or overlapping, and which ones you might be able to walk into. I’ll explain how you find that question in the next step.

Dissertation Coaching

Step 4: Identify your potential research questions (topics)

Now that you have a decent understanding of the state of the literature in your area(s) of interest, it’s time to start developing your list of possible topics. There are (at least) three approaches you can follow here, and they are not mutually exclusive:

Approach 1: Leverage the FRIN

Towards the end of most quality journal articles, you will find a section labelled “further research” or something similar. Generally, researchers will clearly outline where they feel further research is needed (FRIN), following on from their own research. So, essentially, every journal article presents you with a list of potential research opportunities. Of course, only a handful of these will be both practical and of interest to you, so it’s not a quick fix solution to finding a research topic. However, the benefit of going this route is that you will be able to find a genuinely original and meaningful research topic (which is particularly important for PhD-level research).

The upside to this approach is originality, but the downside is that you might not find something that really interests you, or that you have the means to execute. If you do go this route, make sure that you pay attention to the journal article dates, as the FRIN may already be “solved” by other researchers if the article is old.

Use the FRIN for dissertation topics ideas

Approach 2: Put a local or industry-specific spin on established theory

The second option is to consider whether theory which is already well established is relevant within a local or industry-specific context. For example, theory about the antecedents (drivers) of trust is very well established, but there may be unique or uniquely important drivers within a specific national context or industry (for example, within the financial services industry in an emerging market).

If that industry or national context has not yet been covered by researchers AND there is a good reason to believe there may be meaningful differences within that context, then you have an opportunity to take a unique angle on well-established theory, which can make for a great piece of research. It is however imperative that you have a good reason to believe that the existing theory may not be wholly relevant within your chosen context, or your research will not be justified.

The upside to this approach is that you can potentially find a topic that is “closer to home” and more relevant and interesting to you, while still being able to draw on a well-established body of theory. However, the downside is that this approach will likely not produce the level of originality as approach #1.

Do things differently

Approach 3: Uncensored brainstorming

The third option is to skip the FRIN, as well as the local/industry-specific angle and simply engage in a freeform brainstorming or mind-mapping session, using your newfound knowledge of the theory to formulate potential research ideas. What’s important here is that you do not censor yourself. However crazy, unfeasible, or plain stupid your topic appears – write it down. All that matters right now is that you are interested in this thing.

Next, try to turn the topic(s) into a question or problem. For example:

  • What is the relationship between X, Y & Z?
  • What are the drivers/antecedents of X?
  • What are the outcomes of Y?
  • What are the key success factors for Z?

Re-word your list of topics or issues into a list of questions.  You might find at this stage that one topic throws up three questions (which then become sub-topics and even new separate topics in their own right) and in so doing, the list grows. Let it. Don’t hold back or try start evaluating your ideas yet – just let them flow onto paper.

Once you’ve got a few topics and questions on paper, check the literature again to see whether any of these have been covered by the existing research. Since you came up with these from scratch, there is a possibility that your original literature search did not cover them, so it’s important to revisit that phase to ensure that you’re familiar with the relevant literature for each idea. You may also then find that approach #1 and #2 can be used to build on these ideas.

Try use all three approaches

As mentioned earlier, the three approaches discussed here are not mutually exclusive. In fact, the more, the merrier. Hopefully, you manage to utilise all three, as this will give you the best odds of producing a rich list of ideas, which you can then narrow down and evaluate, which is the next step.

Different approaches to finding a research topic

Step 5: Narrow down, then evaluate.

By this stage, you should have a healthy list of research topics. Step away from the ideation and thinking for a few days, clear your mind. The key is to get some distance from your ideas, so that you can sit down with your list and review it with a more objective view. The unbridled ideation phase is over and now it’s time to take a reality check.

Sense check your research topic ideas

Look at your list and see if any options can be crossed off right away.  Maybe you don’t want to do that topic anymore. Maybe the topic turned out to be too broad and threw up 20 hard to answer questions. Maybe all the literature you found about it was 30 years old and you suspect it might not be a very engaging contemporary issue. Maybe this topic is so over-researched that you’ll struggle to find anything fresh to say. Also, after stepping back, it’s quite common to notice that 2 or 3 of your topics are really the same one, the same question, which you’ve written down in slightly different ways. You can try to amalgamate these into one succinct topic.

Narrow down to the top 5, then evaluate.

Now, take your streamlined list and narrow it down to the ‘top 5’ that interest you the most. Personal interest is your key evaluation criterion at this stage. Got your ‘top 5’?  Great!  Now, with a cool head and your best analytical mind engaged, go systematically through each option and evaluate them against the following criteria:

Research questions – what is the main research question, and what are the supporting sub-questions? It’s critically important that you can define these questions clearly and concisely. If you cannot do this, it means you haven’t thought the topic through sufficiently.

Originality – is the topic sufficiently original, as per your university’s originality requirements? Are you able to add something unique to the existing conversation? As mentioned earlier, originality can come in many forms, and it doesn’t mean that you need to find a completely new, cutting-edge topic. However, your university’s requirements should guide your decision-making here.

Importance – is the topic of real significance, or is it just a “nice to know”? If it’s significant, why? Who will benefit from finding the answer to your desired questions and how will they benefit? Justifying your research will be a key requirement for your research proposal, so it’s really important to develop a convincing argument here.

Literature – is there a contemporary (current) body of academic literature around this issue? Is there enough literature for you to base your investigation on, but not too much that the topic is “overdone”? Will you be able to navigate this literature or is it overwhelming?

Data requirements – What kind of data would you need access to in order to answer your key questions?  Would you need to adopt a qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods approach to answer your questions? At this stage, you don’t need to be able to map out your exact research design, but you should be able to articulate how you would approach it in high-level terms. Will you use qual, quant or mixed methods? Why?

Feasibility – How feasible would it be to gather the data that would be needed in the time-frame that you have – and do you have the will power and the skills to do it? If you’re not confident with the theory, you don’t want something that’s going to draw you into a debate about the relative importance of epistemology and ontology. If you are shy, you won’t want to be doing ethnographic interviews. If you feel this question calls for a 100-person survey, do you have the time to plan, organise and conduct it and then analyse it? What will you do if you don’t get the response rate you expect? Be very realistic here and also ask advice from supervisor and other experts – poor response rates are extremely common and can derail even the best research projects.

Personal attraction – On a scale of 1-10, how excited are you about this topic? Will addressing it add value to your life and/or career? Will undertaking the project help you build a skill you’ve previously wanted to work on (for example, interview skills, statistical analysis skills, software skills, etc)?

The last point is particularly important. You will have to engage with your dissertation in a very sustained and deep way, face challenges and difficulties, and get it to completion. If you don’t start out enthusiastic about it, you’re setting yourself up for problems like ‘writer’s block’ or ‘burnout’ down the line. This is the reason personal interest was the sole evaluation criterion when we chose the top 5. So, don’t underestimate the importance of personal attraction to a topic – at the same time, don’t let personal attraction lead you to choose a topic that is not relevant to your course or feasible given your resources. A strong research topic must tick all three boxes – interesting, relevant and feasible.

Narrow down to 3, then get human feedback

We’re almost as the finishing line. The next step is to narrow to 2 or 3 shortlisted topics. No more!  Write a short paragraph about each topic, addressing the following:

  1. WHAT will this study be about. Frame the topic as a question or a problem. Write it as a dissertation title. No more than two clauses and no more than 15 words. Less than 15 is better (go back to good journal articles for inspiration on appropriate title styles).
  2. WHY this is interesting (original) and important – as proven by existing academic literature (i.e. there are people talking about this and there’s an acknowledged problem, debate or gap in the literature).
  3. HOW you plan to answer the question? What sub questions will you use? What methods does this call for and how competent and confident are you in those methods? Do you have the time to gather the data this calls for?

Show the shortlist and accompanying paragraphs to a couple of your peers from your course and also to an expert or two if at all possible (you’re welcome to reach out to us), explaining WHAT you will investigate, WHY this is original and important and HOW you will go about investigating it. Essentially, you should be able to present an elevator pitch for each of your topic ideas.

Dissertation topic elevator pitch

Once you’ve pitched your ideas, ask for the following thoughts:

  • Which is most interesting and appealing to them?
  • Why do they feel this way?
  • What problems do they foresee with the execution of the research?

Take advice and feedback and sit on it for another day. Let it simmer in your mind overnight before you make the final decision. 

Step 6: Make the decision (and stick with it!)

Then, make the commitment. Choose the one that you feel most confident about having now considered both your opinion and the feedback from others.

Once you’ve made a decision, don’t doubt your judgement, don’t shift.  Don’t be tempted by the ones you left behind. You’ve planned and thought things through, checked feasibility and now you can start.  You have your topic. Trust your own decision-making process and stick with it now. It’s time to get started on your research proposal!

Don't doubt your research topic

Let’s recap…

In this post, I’ve proposed a straightforward 6-step plan to finding relevant dissertation topic ideas and then narrowing them down to finally chose one winner. To recap:

  1. Understand the basics of academic research, as well as your university’s specific requirements for a dissertation, thesis or research project.
  2. Review previous dissertations for your course to get an idea of both topics and structure.
  3. Start the ideation process by familiarising yourself with the literature.
  4. Identify your potential research questions (topics).
  5. Narrow down your options, then evaluate systematically.
  6. Make your decision (and don’t look back!)

If you follow these steps, you’ll find that they also set you up for what’s coming next – both the proposal and the first three chapters of your dissertation. But that’s for future posts!

Dissertation Coaching