Research Aims, Objectives & Research Questions

The “Golden Thread” Explained Simply (+ Examples)

By: David Phair (PhD) and Alexandra Shaeffer (PhD) | June 2022

The research aims, objectives and research questions (collectively called the “golden thread”) are arguably the most important thing you need to get right when you’re crafting a research proposal, dissertation or thesis. We receive questions almost every day about this “holy trinity” of research and there’s certainly a lot of confusion out there, so we’ve crafted this post to help you navigate your way through the fog.

What is the “golden thread”? 

The golden thread simply refers to the collective research aims, research objectives, and research questions for any given project (i.e., a dissertation, thesis, or research paper). These three elements are bundled together because it’s extremely important that they align with each other, and that the entire research project aligns with them.

Importantly, the golden thread needs to weave its way through the entirety of any research project, from start to end. In other words, it needs to be very clearly defined right at the beginning of the project (the topic ideation and proposal stage) and it needs to inform almost every decision throughout the rest of the project. For example, your research design and methodology will be heavily influenced by the golden thread (we’ll explain this in more detail later), as well as your literature review.

The research aims, objectives and research questions (the golden thread) define the focus and scope of your research project. In other words, they help ringfence your dissertation or thesis to a relatively narrow domain, so that you can “go deep” and really dig into a specific problem or opportunity. They also help keep you on track, as they act as a litmus test for relevance. In other words, if you’re ever unsure whether to include something in your document, simply ask yourself the question, “does this contribute toward my research aims, objectives or questions?”. If it doesn’t, chances are you can drop it.

Alright, enough of the fluffy, conceptual stuff. Let’s get down to business and look at what exactly the research aims, objectives and questions are and outline a few examples to bring these concepts to life.

The golden thread helps to keep you on track, as the research aims, objectives and questions act as a litmus test for the relevance of any content.

Research Aims: What are they?

Simply put, the research aim(s) is a statement that reflects the broad overarching goal(s) of the research project. Research aims are fairly high-level (low resolution) as they outline the general direction of the research and what it’s trying to achieve.

Research Aims: Examples 

True to the name, research aims usually start with the wording “this research aims to…”, “this research seeks to…”, and so on. For example:

  • “This research aims to explore employee experiences of digital transformation in retail HR.
  • “This study sets out to assess the interaction between student support and self-care on well-being in engineering graduate students” 

As you can see, these research aims provide a high-level description of what the study is about and what it seeks to achieve. They’re not hyper-specific or action-oriented, but they’re clear about what the study’s focus is and what is being investigated.

Need a helping hand?

See how Grad Coach can help you...

 

Research Objectives: What are they?

The research objectives take the research aims and make them more practical and actionable. In other words, the research objectives showcase the steps that the researcher will take to achieve the research aims.

The research objectives need to be far more specific (higher resolution) and actionable than the research aims. In fact, it’s always a good idea to craft your research objectives using the “SMART” criteria. In other words, they should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound”.

Research Objectives: Examples 

Let’s look at two examples of research objectives. We’ll stick with the topic and research aims we mentioned previously. 

For the digital transformation topic: 

  1. To observe the retail HR employees throughout the digital transformation.
  2. To assess employee perceptions of digital transformation in retail HR.
  3. To identify the barriers and facilitators of digital transformation in retail HR.

And for the student wellness topic: 

  1. To determine whether student self-care predicts the well-being score of engineering graduate students.
  2. To determine whether student support predicts the well-being score of engineering students.
  3. To assess the interaction between student self-care and student support when predicting well-being in engineering graduate students.

 As you can see, these research objectives clearly align with the previously mentioned research aims and effectively translate the low-resolution aims into (comparatively) higher-resolution objectives and action points. They give the research project a clear focus and present something that resembles a research-based “to-do” list.

The research objectives detail the specific steps that you, as the researcher, will take to achieve the research aims you laid out.

Research Questions: What are they?

Finally, we arrive at the all-important research questions. The research questions are, as the name suggests, the key questions that your study will seek to answer. Simply put, they are the core purpose of your dissertation, thesis, or research project. You’ll present them at the beginning of your document (either in the introduction chapter or literature review chapter) and you’ll answer them at the end of your document (typically in the discussion and conclusion chapters). 

The research questions will be the driving force throughout the research process. For example, in the literature review chapter, you’ll assess the relevance of any given resource based on whether it helps you move towards answering your research questions. Similarly, your methodology and research design will be heavily influenced by the nature of your research questions. For instance, research questions that are exploratory in nature will usually make use of a qualitative approach, whereas questions that relate to measurement or relationship testing will make use of a quantitative approach. 

Let’s look at some examples of research questions to make this more tangible.

Research Questions: Examples 

Again, we’ll stick with the research aims and research objectives we mentioned previously. 

For the digital transformation topic (which would be qualitative in nature): 

  1. How do employees perceive digital transformation in retail HR?
  2. What are the barriers and facilitators of digital transformation in retail HR? 

And for the student wellness topic (which would be quantitative in nature): 

  1. Does student self-care predict the well-being scores of engineering graduate students?
  2. Does student support predict the well-being scores of engineering students?
  3. Do student self-care and student support interact when predicting well-being in engineering graduate students? 

You’ll probably notice that there’s quite a formulaic approach to this. In other words, the research questions are basically the research objectives “converted” into question format. While that is true most of the time, it’s not always the case. For example, the first research objective for the digital transformation topic was more or less a step on the path toward the other objectives, and as such, it didn’t warrant its own research question. 

So, don’t rush your research questions and sloppily reword your objectives as questions. Carefully think about what exactly you’re trying to achieve (i.e. your research aim) and the objectives you’ve set out, then craft a set of well-aligned research questions. Also, keep in mind that this can be a somewhat iterative process, where you go back and tweak research objectives and aims to ensure tight alignment throughout the golden thread.

 Your research questions will be the driving force throughout the research process, especially in the literature review and methodology chapters.

The importance of strong alignment 

Alignment is the keyword here and we have to stress its importance. Simply put, you need to make sure that there is a very tight alignment between all three pieces of the golden thread. If your research aims and research questions don’t align, for example, your project will be pulling in different directions and will lack focus. This is a common problem students face and can cause many headaches (and tears), so be warned.

Take the time to carefully craft your research aims, objectives and research questions before you run off down the research path. Ideally, get your research supervisor/advisor to review and comment on your golden thread before you invest significant time into your project, and certainly before you start collecting data. 

Recap: The golden thread

In this post, we unpacked the golden thread of research, consisting of the research aims, research objectives and research questions. You can jump back to any section using the links below.

  1. What is the golden thread
  2. What are research aims (examples)
  3. What are research objectives (examples)
  4. What are research questions (examples)
  5. The importance of alignment in the golden thread

As always, feel free to leave a comment below – we always love to hear from you. Also, if you’re interested in 1-on-1 support, take a look at our private coaching service here.

Psst… there’s more (for free)

This post is part of our research writing mini-course, which covers everything you need to get started with your dissertation, thesis or research project.

Share This